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Again, not written by me:

A helm pedestal containing a 36” destroyer type helm wheel, engine controls, Garmin depth instrument, and a Danforth compass was seen affixed in the center of the cockpit (see; Steering, Navigation). The Danforth compass was seen to be accurate when compared to the ship’s electronic compass (less than 1 degree variation). A 12” safety hoop was seen to wrap around the pedestal.

A center locker was seen under the aft helm seat. The locker was seen to be fitted with a custom rack designed to hold 4 scuba tanks and additional gear. This locker also provides access to the generator space located below the cockpit sole. The locker space was seen to be clean and free of garbage and bilge debris.

A gusher type emergency bilge was seen fitted behind a protection plate in the aft footwell to starboard, however, the pump handle could not be located (See recommendations).

A Kenyon anemometer and apparent wind indicator, and Heathkit knot, log, and depth meter indicators were seen located in the cockpit against the aft coachroof bulkhead. When tested, none of these instruments were seen to function properly. (see Suggestions)

Masts and Spars:
The masts and spars were closely inspected and the following observations noted;

The spar system utilized on this vessel is a staysail ketch design. This includes a footed foresail, main sail, and mizzen sail.

The main and mizzen masts are keel stepped aluminum, and appear to be the factory installed spars. The main mast is a double spreader design with a cross section of approximately 8.5 inches by 5 inches.

The shorter mizzen mast, rigged with single spreaders, was seen with an approximate cross section of 7 inches by 4.5 inches. The Foresail boom, main boom, and mizzen boom are all constructed from aluminum spars. No significant corrosion was seen on the masts or stars.

The mast collar plates and shoes were closely inspected. The collar plates and shoes were found to be in good condition. The main mast boot was seen in unacceptable condition with evidence of leakage around the boot.

The mizzen mast boot was nonexistent. The Mizzen mast leakage drains directly into the bilge and has caused no observable issue.(see recommendations)

Evidence of main mast boot leakage was seen on the sole plate around the mast base in the salon and head.

The main mast was seen equipped with (1) Barlow-4 caged halyard cable winch, (2) Barlow 20 single speed, non-tailing working winches, and 1 Lewmar 16 single speed, non-tailing downhaul winch (see Running Rigging).

The mizzen mast was seen fitted with (1) Barlow 16 single speed, non-tailing working winch (see running rigging for winch condition and detail).

The main mast was seen fitted with a winch handle pocket with a single Lewmar style 10” roller handle. No winch handles were seen in the cockpit or in a mizzen mast pocket. (see recommendations).

The masts were seen fitted with appropriately affixed halyard exits and cleats. All cleats were seen to be properly and securely mounted.

The goosenecks were seen to be of a SS type, in good condition with minimal wear on the necks and pins. No reefing hooks were seen.

Attached to the base of the main boom approximately 8 inches from the gooseneck was seen a triple jammer block for outhaul and double reefing.

A Furuno radar dome was seen below the single spreader location on the mizzen mast (see Electronics). Spreader lights were seen attached to the underside of the main mast lower spreaders.

No boom vang or spinnaker pole were seen on the vessel. The main boom was seen to be in acceptable condition.

The staysail was seen to be hanked-on to the baby stay. An aluminum staysail boom with pintle base was seen well affixed and properly bedded just aft of the windless. The staysail halyard was seen affixed to the staysail (see Running Rigging)

In its present condition, the masts and spars are in good usable condition.

Standing Rigging:
The standing rigging was closely inspected and the following observations noted;

The turnbuckles are of the jam nut design. Although the tensioning of the standing rigging was found correct, several of the jam nuts have not been retightened to insure adjustments to the shrouds remain secure (see recommendations).

Main mast standing rigging:

The forestay was seen to be ½ inch 9×19 stainless steel wire running from the top of the main mast to the bowsprit, and down to the bow above the waterline. The stay was seen in good condition with no evidence of cracked wires or corrosion. The stay was seen to be properly tensioned and serviceable. Anti-corrosion swaging compound was observed at the wire/swage connection.

The baby stay was seen to be a 7/16 9×19 stainless steel wire, running from the top of the mast to the delta plate attached to the deck. The stay was seen in good condition. The stay was seen to be properly tensioned and serviceable. Anti-corrosion compound was observed at the wire/swage connection. The delta deck plate was seen to be securely attached and properly bedded.

The lower shrouds of the main mast were seen to be 3/8 inch, 9×19 stainless wire with thru-mast toggles at the top, and turnbuckle to pin with shackle at the bottom. The lower shrouds were seen to be in good condition. The sealant at the stay/swage connection was seen to be intact with no corrosion evident. The turnbuckles on all four lower main stays were seen to be corroded. No evidence of cracks were present (see recommendations).

The main mast intermediate and upper shrouds were seen to be 3/8 inch 9×19 stainless steel wire running form the top of the main mast to the chainplates fore and aft of the mast boot, both port and starboard. The stays were seen in good condition with no evidence of cracked wires or corrosion. The stay was seen to be properly tensioned and serviceable. Anti-corrosion compound was observed at the wire/swage connection. All four intermediate and upper shroud turnbuckles were seen to have substantial corrosion (see recommendations).

The main mast is equipped with running back stays. The stays were seen to be 3/8 inch 1×19 stainless steel wire running from the top of the main mast to the tensioning blocks. From the tensioning blocks, the rigging is changed to ½ dynema type control line running through double blocks. From the upper double blocks, the control lines run through lower double control blocks with attached cam cleats. The lower blocks connect to a short length of 3/8 shroud, then to a set of chainplates. The stays were seen in good condition with no evidence of cracked wires or corrosion. The stays were seen to be functioning and in serviceable order.

The mizzen mast intermediate shrouds were closely inspected. They were seen to be 7/16, 9×19 stainless steel wire with swaged terminus. Signs of corrosion at the lower swage were present on all lower mizzen shroud swages (see recommendations).

The mizzen upper shrouds were closely inspected. They were seen to be 7/16, 9×19 stainless steel wire with swaged terminus. They were seen to be in serviceable condition.

Chainplates;
The chainplates were closely inspected and the following observations noted;

All chainplates/ deck attachment points were visible to the surveyor. All chainplates were seen to be corrosion free, securely attached, and properly bedded. However, several of the chainplates were visible from the underdeck. Where visible, underdeck chainplate bolt backing consisted of single washers backing the chainplate bolts. Although the chainplates remain in original manufacturer configuration and Challenger Yacht Corp. is known for their durable hull production and unlimited hull guarantee, it is the opinion of this surveyor that more substantial backing should be installed beneath the chainplate mount points.

Running Rigging:
The running rigging was closely inspected and the following observations noted;

The following winches were seen fitted. They were operated and found to operate smoothly and crisply. Grease remnants suggest that the winches have received regular maintenance;

(1) Barlow-4 caged wire halyard on main
(2) Barlow 20 single speed, non-tailing, port and starboard on main mast
(1) Lewmar 16 single speed non-tailing downhaul/ reefing winch on main mast
(1) Barlow 16 single speed non-tailing on mizzen/mizzen halyard winch
(2) Barlow 26 2-speed self-tailing primary winches / cockpit coaming
(1) Barlow 20 single speed non-tailing / coachroof mainsheet and traveler
(2) Asahi 16 single speed non-tailing secondary working winches/aft of primary

Travelers;
The main sheet traveler is mounted to the coachroof fore of the companionway hatch. The traveler traverses the entire coachroof and is controlled by 3/8 lines led to the cockpit and controlled by a double jammer affixed to the coachroof. The traveler, primary car, and mainsheet blocks were all seen in good serviceable condition. The sheaves were seen to run smoothly and the traveler and jammers were found to operate correctly.

Staysail halyard;
The staysail halyard is run from the mast base to the cockpit via a 3/8 inch line running through blocks and fairleads up the starboard deck/toe rail. The blocks and fairleads were seen in good serviceable condition. All sheaves were found to operate smoothly.

Jib/Spinnaker cars;
Approximate 14 foot Jib tracks and cars were seen fitted to the toe rail along the portion outboard to the cockpit. The track was seen to be stainless steel with stainless cars. The cars were noted to be the pin type. The track was seen to be bolted with SS tapered screws. The tracks were seen to be securely attached with all fasteners secured. When operated, the cars were found to operate. They were found to be stiff, but consistent with this style of car.

Control lines;
All control lines were seen to be appropriately sized for their use. All lines were seen as the synthetic cord type. The main halyard was seen to be a 1/19 x 5/16 SS. All lines were seen to be of the dynema style single braid type. All lines were seen to have appropriate tracer colors. All lines were seen to be serviceable with displayed no abnormal signs of wear or fray.

Sails and canvas:
The sails and canvas were inspected and the following observations noted;
Note: the sails were not raised for this inspection.

The sails were seen to be covered with tan Sunbrella sail covers. The covers were found to be well made and fit securely. The covers were found to use a combination of twist clips and Velcro to secure them around the slab reefed sails. The sail cloth was found to be crisp and well stitched. There was no evidence of unusual wear or tears. All grommets, clew plates, and head plates were seen to be secure with no notable corrosion detected. All sail sliders were seen to be attached. All shackles were seen to be of the SS type and appropriately sized for their load.

Interior spaces

Forepeak:
A small forepeak was seen fore of the V-berth stateroom bulkhead. Access to the forepeak is found through a hatch above the V-berth in the forward section of the vessel. The forepeak was seen to serve as the chain locker and found to contain the chain and rode (see ground tackle).

Master stateroom:
The master stateroom was closely inspected and the following observations noted;

The master stateroom was seen to consist of a V-berth center in the fore of the vessel. The cushions for the berth were seen to be of custom construction using newer foam and covering. Owner documentation substantiates this conclusion.

The hull sides are planked teak over the FRP hull. A single hanging locker is found to starboard.

Storage was seen beneath the V-birth cushions via recessed hatch panels. Teak louvered doors at the base of the berth pedestal provide additional locker space. Although the varnish was seen in serviceable condition, a re-varnish would be strongly suggested.

Master head:
Located aft and to port of the V-berth bulkhead, was seen the vessel’s only head. The head was seen to be fitted with a Raritan electric macerating toilet. When tested, the macerator pump was found to be frozen and as such, the head was found to be inoperable.

The head contains a shower space which encapsulated the head/shower and strum, and is partitioned through the use of a free hanging shower curtain. The shower valve was found to function properly. Evidence of surface corrosion was seen on the valve, but did not affect the performance of the valve. The shower space was seen to be fitted with a bronze porthole. The dogs were found to be stiff, but functional. Evidence of prior leakage around the port was seen.

The wall surfaces of the shower space were seen to be covered with an inexpensive Masonite shower-board product. The installation of this shower-board was seen to be a substandard installation. Exposed edges and gaps in the joints were seen.

Two portholes provide natural light and ventilation to the head. The ports, approximately 10 inches by 5 inches, were seen to be the bronze type with bronze dogs. The dogs were operated and found to be stiff, but functioning. Staining around the lower flange of the porthole indicates prior leakage. The portholes were seen to appear properly bedded, suggesting that the leak issues have been resolved.

No holding tank or Y-valve was seen to be installed on this yacht. The head was seen to draw in raw water and discharge the effluent back into the sea.

A separate sink was seen in the head. The sink was seen to be a poly-composite sink, properly sealed and properly draining. The vanity faucet was tested and found to function properly. Minimal storage was seen above the vanity, behind a teak slat door. Various head accoutrements, towel bars, and toilet paper holders were seen attached to the woodwork.

A 120VAC outlet was seen affixed to the vanity cabinet face (see Electrics).

Pantry locker:
Aft of the V-berth bulkhead and to starboard of the head, was seen a pantry locker. The locker was seen fitted with a matching teak slat door and sliding wire racks inside. Above the pantry was seen a small work surface approximately 20 inches by 20 inches. As with most of the fine woodwork on this yacht, the teak would benefit from varnishing. Above the pantry on the side of the coachroof, another matching bronze porthole was seen. When operated, the dogs were found to be stiff but functional. Water staining on the lower edge of the teak panel suggests prior leaking.

A 12VDC ventilation fan was seen attached aft of the V-berth bulkhead to serve the salon. When tested it was found inoperable. A 12VDC outlet was seen attached aft of the V-berth bulkhead. This outlet was tested and found operational. Attached aft the pantry locker was seen a 120VAC outlet. When tested, it was found to be operational (see Electrics).

Located above the pantry locker workspace to the outboard was seen a small storage locker. This locker was seen fitted with a matching teak door.

Salon:
Aft of the head, to the port side was seen the salon.

The salon was seen to consist of a u-shaped dinette with collapsible table. The table was seen to be collapsible to convert the dinette into additional berthing space. No additional berth cushions were seen. The seat cushions were seen to be recently fabricated with new foam and covering. The cushions were found to be firm and pliable. No tears or abrasions were seen. Storage space was seen under the fore and port cushions. The space under the aft cushion was seen to house the engine space, house batteries, and hot water heater (see Engine space, Batteries).

The salon sole plate was seen to be teak and holly. The sole plate in the salon, and throughout the interior of the vessel was seen to be solid and of sturdy construction, but in need of varnish. Access to the tankage was seen beneath the salon sole.

A bookshelf was seen to port outboard above the salon dinette. A series of fixed portlights were seen above the bookshelf. The portlights were seen to be well sealed with minimal prior leakage.

Opposite the salon dinette, to starboard was seen a salon settee.

Like the rest of the yacht’s cushions, the settee cushions were seen to be recently constructed with new materials in a nautical theme. Additional storage was seen beneath the settee.

A second 120VAC outlet was seen fixed against the fore bulkhead of the navigation station above the settee. Two 12VDC reading lights were seen mounted in the overhead panel. Both lights were seen to be functional, although the light housing to aft was seen to be missing its mounting plate (see Electrics).

Another larger pantry locker was seen aft of the settee, separating the settee and the navigation station. This locker was seen to have replacement teak doors that are inconsistent with the rest of the yacht. Evidence of the original doors can still be seen in the locker face framing. The teak doors were found to be ill-fitting with unmatched hardware.

Galley:
The galley was were closely inspected and the following observations noted;

The galley was seen located aft of the salon dinette. The U-shaped galley is accessed from amidships near the base of the companionway steps.

The woodwork in the galley was seen to have been properly varnished and showed well. The galley work surfaces were seen to be a Formica material. This material appears to have been a recent upgrade. To fore and amidships in the galley, a removable section of the cabinet work was seen. This removable cabinet serves as the primary engine space cover/access. To port of the engine space access was found the galley sink. The single bowl basin was seen to be a newer upgrade. The galley faucet was seen to be a new Delta brand residential model. When operated, the galley faucet was seen to operate as expected. To port of the faucet was seen a cutting board that serves as a storage cover.

Hanging above the galley sink, and well attached to the coachroof was seen storage shelving and the galley light. The shelving was seen to be sturdy and well constructed. When tested, the light was seen to function (see electrics).

To port in the galley was seen a 3-burner LPG Dickinson oven/cooktop. An electric solenoid controlling the LPG fuel was seen mounted above the unit to aft. It was untested due to the lack of pressurized fuel. The gimbaled stove was untested as the propane line and regulator were found uninstalled in the galley cabinet. No pot retainers were seen in the galley.

To aft of the galley was seen the coldbox refrigerator. It was seen as a coldplate type with both 12VDC and 120VAC compressors. The compressors were seen in the mechanical space beneath the cockpit footwell.

When power was applied to the system, the refrigerator immediately began to cool. The system was tested in both AC and DC and both were found to function properly. The refrigerator box was seen to be clean and odor free. The condensate drain line was found to be clear and unobstructed.

Located above the refrigerator was seen additional plate storage. The combination drawers and sliding doors were seen as well constructed with working security latches. Located inside the plate shelve was seen a stemware rack.

A Kiddie BC type fire extinguisher was seen affixed to the aft bulkhead near the stove. No date tag was seen and the service gauge indicator suggested that the extinguisher was charged and ready if needed.

Located above the stove was seen a vent. The screen to the vent was seen as missing.

Navigation station:
The Navigation station was closely inspected and the following observations noted;

Located at the base of the companionway to starboard was seen a dedicated space for Navigation.

The navigation station was seen to house a working chart table, chart cabinet, ship’s main electrical, and various navigation electronics (see Electronics). As with the rest of the cushions, the navigation station cushions were seen in newer condition with no tear or wear issues noted. The navigation station was found to be spacious for a vessel in this size category.

Inside the chart locker, seen under the table work surface, a variety of manual chart implements were seen. A 3-drawer locker was seen below the chart table. This space was seen to be used for emergency gear storage (see Safety Equipment). The drawers were seen to function smoothly and have positive locking systems to prevent accidental opening.

Aft port stateroom:
Located opposite the navigation station and to port, was seen the aft stateroom. When inspected, the aft stateroom was seen being utilized for storage. Cockpit cushions were seen stored on the double berth. No berth mattress or cushions were seen.

By far the more spacious of the two staterooms, the aft stateroom was seen with a 3-drawer locker aft and amidships, drawer and storage under the berth, a short locker and workspace to port, and workspace fore. The woodwork was seen to be well maintained. All doors and drawers functioned, with no notable defects in woodwork. A mirror was seen affixed to the fore bulkhead to port. The mirror was seen with flaking reflective material around its edges.

Two reading lights were seen in the berth. When operated, the lights were seen to function properly.

The teak and holly sole plate was seen to be in need of varnish. The space beneath the removable sole plate was seen to house the freshwater pressure pump. The pump was seen to be a Flo-jet self-regulating pressure pump with an internal demand switch. When tested, the pump was seen to operate properly and pressurize both hot and cold fresh water supplies.

Engine and engine spaces:
The engine and engine spaces were closely inspected and the following observations noted;

Auxilary propulsion for the yacht is generated through the use of a single Nissan SD22 diesel engine. The 4-cylinder diesel engine produces 61 horsepower. The engine was seen mounted to a Hearth transmission.

The engine was seen fitted with a closed water cooling system. The engine was tested and found to start easily, idle smoothly, and run without any unusual or worrisome noises. During testing, the engine was run for 20 minutes and the exhaust temperature measured at the manifold. The engine maintained an even 95 degree F. when brought to temperature. With the engine running, the transmission was engaged in both forward and reverse, and the transmission was found to shift smoothly and deliver power to the propeller.

It is a noteworthy comment on the engine; although the engine hour meter was seen to register 710 hours, owner documentation verifies a recent engine rebuild. No documentation substantiates the exact hour of the rebuild, but engine performance, appearance, and existing documentation would suggest that the engine hours would be less than 20 hours SMOH. Also, it was seen that the shift cables, alternator, starter, and many of the engine/transmission components were seen to be in new condition, with substantiating documentation.

Three water/fuel filters were seen affixed to the primary engine fuel system. Two of the filters, located under the sole plate, starboard and aft of the transmission, were seen to be the Racor 500 series filters with staggered filtration. A primary filter was seen fitted to the engine. When the engine was operational, a small fuel leak was detected from the water valve at the base of the filter. It was tightened and the leak stopped.

Several engine spares were seen throughout the yacht. Primary spares were seen in the navigation station drawers with the other emergency equipment.

The flex coupler that transfers power from the transmission to the propeller shaft was seen to be in serviceable condition. The propeller shaft, a typical 35mm SS shaft was seen to turn true when under load. The shaft housing was inspected and seen to be leak free. The packing and gland nut were seen to be properly tensioned and serviced.

A new 85A alternator was seen fitted to the engine. The alternator was seen to be wired into both the ship’s starting and house battery circuits via a battery isolator.

The engine wiring was seen to be properly grounded with the wiring neatly secured.

No engine bonding was seen (see recommendations).

The engine was seen with a new Vetus raw water strainer and Vetus waterbox (located under the galley sink. The engine mounts were seen to be flexible and unbroken.

Bilge water was observed about 4” deep. Bilge clearance operations were seen conducted by (2) Rule 1500 automatic bilge pumps with float switches. The bilge controls were seen located on the aft navigation station bulkhead. An emergency Gusher type manual bilge pump was seen affixed to the cockpit footwell. When the electric bilge pumps were operated, both were found to function properly on both automatic and manual modes.

Batteries:
The vessel was seen equipped with (4) Group 24 type batteries. (2) Optima blue top batteries were seen under the aft dinette seat, date coded 7/13 and 8/13, and tested fully charged,. (2) Interstate marine starting batteries were seen located in the mechanical space beneath the cockpit sole, both date coded 4/14, and tested as fully charged. All battery cables were seen to be of the appropriate size and color for the application. All connections were seen to be free of corrosion and securely mounted.

The battery switch function was seen to be accomplished through the use of a Perko type rotary switch located behind the helm station. The switch was found to function correctly.

Electrics:
The ship’s electrical circuits were closely inspected and the following observations noted;

A recent upgraded circuit panel was seen installed behind the navigation station on the bulkhead. The new Newmar panel was seen properly installed and all circuits labeled. All circuit indicator lights were seen to function. All breakers were seen to function properly and provide adequate circuit interruption. All circuits were seen to have appropriate amperage protection. All circuits were tested individually, and all circuits were seen to power up correctly.

The ship’s power wires were seen to be recently upgraded. All wires were seen to be tinned marine grade with correctly protected connections. No corrosion was observed at the terminal points.
The access to the main distribution panel was seen to be located in a locker aft of the Navigation station. A unmounted Plexiglas panel separated the locker storage from the electrical connection points (see recommendations).

All lights were seen to operate correctly. The light over the galley sink was seen to be inoperable due to a bad bulb. All 12VDC receptacles were seen to be working correctly. All 120VAC outlets were seen to be working correctly. The 120VAC circuits were seen to be missing GFCI protection and galvanic isolator protection.
Unless otherwise specified, all other electrical equipment was seen to operate.

The vessel was seen to be equipped with a 2.5 kw diesel generator from an unknown manufacturer. The generator was found in the mechanical space located under the cockpit footwell, and accessed via a companionway hatch located behind the companionway stairs. The generator was seen to be in clean condition, but when tested, it appeared as though the starting circuit was not energized. The generator was therefore not tested. (2) Racor water/fuel separating filters were seen mounted to the bulkhead by the generator, and supply fuel to the generator via the ship’s main fuel tank.

A Charles 30a battery charger was seen in the mechanical space below the cockpit sole. The charger was seen to be a newer unit and functioning correctly during the survey.

Electronics:
The electronics were closely inspected and the following observations noted;

Located at the navigation station were seen and tested the following equipment;
Furuno 1700 radar, inoperable
Garmin GPSmap 192c, operable
Regency Polaris sterio/cassette operable
Uniden Oceanus VHP (aft of avigation station) operable

Located at the helm
Garmin GMI 10 instrument display head, tested for depth, operable

Steering:
The steering system was closely inspected and the following observations noted;

The steering on the vessel was seen to be a 36” destroyer type helm wheel mounted to a pedestal in the cockpit. The helm shaft was seen to mount to a chain/cable system led to the mechanical space under the cockpit sole. The cable was seen attached to a quadrant mounted to the rudder stock.

When tested, the helm responded smoothly from band to band. The cable and attachment hardware were seen to be corrosion free and well secured. The quadrant was seen to be free of cracks or notable wear. The gudgeon was closely inspected and seen to be free of cracks or damage. The gudgeon was seen leak free. The moving components of the steering were seen maintained and greased.

Safety and firefighting:
The safety and firefighting equipment was closely inspected and the following observations noted;

1. Only one fire extinguisher was located within the vessel (galley).
2. Two bags were seen in the locker aft of the navigation station. These were seen to contain (6) assorted life jackets. The jackets were seen to be in serviceable condition.
3. Flairs, a flair gun, and sound signaling device were seen in the locker drawers of the navigation station.
4. Fresh and salt water bibs were seen in the cockpit, fore of the engine controls.
5. A “Life Sling” was seen in the aft stateroom.
6. No throwable device was seen.

Ground tackle:
The ground tackle was closely inspected and the following observations noted;

50 feet of ½” galvanized chain, attached to approximately 100feet of ¾” rode was seen in the anchor locker. The chain and rode were seen to be clean and corrosion free. An anchor swivel was seen attached to the end of the chain.

Mounted to the bow pulpit were seen (1) 26lb Fortress type anchor and (1) 45lb claw anchor. The Danforth anchor was mounted to the pulpit railing. The claw anchor was seen resting in the roller cradle and connected to the chain/rode and the electric windless.
A Maxwell Nilsson electric windless was seen mounted to the bow above the anchor locker. A foot switch was seen mounted next to the windless on the deck. A remote access plug was seen in the aft cockpit footwell, but no remote switch was seen. The windless was operated briefly and found in working condition.

A deck cleat was seen properly bedded and securely mounted near the rode. No safety lines were seen attached to the Fortress anchor.

Mooring lines were seen attached to the vessel. Additional mooring lines were also seen stored in the aft stateroom. Several fenders were seen attached to the railing and in use while the vessel was moored at the dock.

Environmental Protection:
An Oil discharge placard was seen mounted to the bulkhead behind the companionway steps. No refuse placard was seen affixed to the vessel. No sewage discharge placard was seen affixed to the vessel.

Ancillary equipment:
None observed

Miscellaneous:
A new Force 10, 120VAC 6-gallon hot water heater was seen fitted under the aft dinette seat. When powered, the unit produced hot water to the galley, vanity, and shower valves.

Several pieces of teak trim were seen missing from several areas on the yacht.

Conclusions:
The following are the opinions of this surveyor.

This vessel was a determined to be a post-retirement project of her current owner. When health conditions arose, the owner was forced to stop his refit work. Because the owner was a private pilot, he maintained immaculate records of all work and documentation for the work performed by himself and others.
The vessel was seen in overall good condition, given its age. The hull was found to be structurally sound. Challenger Yachts are well known for their heavy and durable hull construction. There were no indications of any groundings or accidents and the hull was seen as sturdy and seaworthy. Although the cosmetic finish was poorly applied, it would take little effort to clean up the paintwork. The woodwork and bright work, with minor maintenance and varnish would add greatly to the overall appearance of the vessel.
The sail plan, spars, and sails would be reasonably expected to last for many years with continued regular maintenance. Although some standing rigging issues were identified, these are considered minor in scope, and relatively inexpensive to address.
Many of the mechanical systems on the yacht are new replacement items. Quality parts and components were selected and seen to be of correct size for their intended use.
It was clear to this surveyor that the owner was in the process of much of the cosmetic work when he became unable to continue. There is clearly an attention to detail for the majority of work that has been completed.
The navigation electronics suite is old, and the newer equipment is found to be insufficient for the yacht’s capabilities. In her present configuration, this yacht could easily be sailed coastal with just a few days of yacht preparation. With the addition of higher quality navigation components, this vessel would make a wonderful and stable bluewater cruiser.
Mechanically, the vessel was found in sound condition and well maintained. I was surprised that all the yacht’s electrical systems were found in working order. Even new production yachts can be found to have issues in this regard. The new wiring was seen to be a reasonably clean installation.
Overall, I would submit that this yacht could be prepared within a few days to be moved to any other location in North, Central, or South America, or the Caribbean. With a few weeks of repairs and additional sailing equipment, this vessel could be relocated to any location in the world.

Surveyor’s estimation of value:

There were five other Challenger Staysail Ketch 40’s identified for sale in the world yacht marketplace at the time of this survey. The lowest priced yacht was found offered at $12,000 in South Florida. That yacht lacked the capacity to even be sailed in its present condition. The highest valued comparable yacht was listed on Yachtworld.com for $69,000. This yacht was very well maintained, immaculately varnished, and repowered with a new Yanmar 4 series diesel with a Kanzaki-4 transmission.

Given the present cosmetic condition of this yacht, I would place the low value at $25,000.00. Given that this yacht has had major documented refit and upgrades to her systems, and is in a state where she can be prepped for sailing within a few days, I would place the high value of this vessel in her current condition at $38,500.00.

Recommendations and Suggestions

Recommendations:
These recommendations are predicated on necessity for the safe operation of the vessel and its crew. Many of these recommendations are mandatory for acquiring insurance, or passing a USCG inspection.

1. Install required secondary clamps on all thru-hull fittings below waterline.
2. Install Lifeline lower wires on gates and rear stanchions
3. Haul the vessel, sound the hull for voids and osmotic blistering, and reapply new antifouling.
4. Locate or replace the manual gusher emergency bilge operating handle.
5. Locate or fabricate an emergency tiller.
6. Install and seal new mast boots.
7. Add a second cockpit winch handle, and add a third to the emergency kit.
8. Secure jam nuts and/or replace all standing rigging turnbuckles.
9. Replace mizzen lower shrouds.
10. Install #8 solid green copper wire for engine/thruhull bonding.
11. Secure the protection panel behind the electrical distribution panel to prevent electrical damage/fire.

Suggestions:
These suggestions are given for the regular maintenance or overall protection of the yacht and to prevent vessel deterioration or devaluation.

1. Subscribe to regular service to remove marine growth from the hull.
2. Apply varnish to the rub rail to prevent deterioration.
3. Apply varnish to the toe rail to prevent deterioration.
4. Strip and varnish all woodwork, throughout.
5. Remove antiquated electronics from cockpit and replace with electronics that make this vessel capable of bluewater use.

Respectfully submitted by;

***********
Ocean Dreams Yacht Services

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